Ken’s Take on the World


Resisting 45!!

For those of you who follow me on Facebook or on Twitter, and those of you who have read my blogs on WordPress, you know that I have expressed opposition to many of the things that candidate Trump, and now President Trump, has done. I have also expressed opposition to many of the positions and legislation advocated by elected Republicans including the Affordable Health Care Act (AHCA) and the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA). As a result of statements I have made, I have recently noted a number of folks who support the current President reply to these statements on social media with a variation of “Well, what have Democrats proposed?” Or, “Democrats will continue to lose elections if they have no policy position to promote and only function as an anti-Trump party!” Comments such as these are beyond annoying as they are simply the comments made by talking heads in the pseudo-conservative media environment and completely ignore the realities of what is happening in our American democracy.

 

Let me address the comments about Democrats losing elections, first. In the 2016 Presidential election, the Democrat, Hillary Rodham Clinton earned nearly three million more votes than her Republican rival in the general election. Of course, her opponent has claimed that millions of illegal votes were cast and that he, without providing any evidence to support his claims, actually won the popular vote. This is a position that is still supported by many of his most stalwart supporters. Likewise, only 33% of Republicans agree with the evidence that Russia, specifically, interfered with US election processes in 2016. This is in stark contrast to what Democrats and Independents believe on the matter of Russian interference in the election. The Republican view also stands in contrast to what US and foreign intelligence services have confirmed which is that Russia, and groups affiliated with the Russian government, made a concerted effort to interfere with the US Presidential election in 2016.

 

With regard to Congressional races and state legislative races, multiple studies and commentary here, here, and here have demonstrated that a major culprit contributing to the makeup of legislative bodies is a result of how district maps are drawn. Several reports including this interesting study looked at whether Democrats or Republicans tended to produce more gerrymandered districts when entrusted with the responsibility of drawing lines. While these demonstrate a modest benefit for Republicans currently, this does not explain the entirety of GOP gains at the legislative levels. Furthermore, gerrymandering does not impact races for state governors as these are decided strictly upon a popular vote within the particular state. Other factors are clearly at play in these elections as well. This brief primer demonstrates some of the changes in voting trends since the early 1900’s. The role of media, specifically Fox News, also appears to drive some of the support for Republican candidates as researched in this older piece by the National Bureau of Economic Research position paper.

 

This May poll from Pew demonstrates the largest historical gap between Democrats and Republicans on the role of the media in providing news and information. This January analysis from Pew found that Trump voters received the bulk of their news/information from Fox News. Among Clinton supporters, no single news or information source provided the bulk of decision-making input. A report from December 2016 pointed out bipartisan concerns relating to the role of “fake” news and its negative impacts. Coincidentally, a fact check of leading political pundits finds that pseudo-conservative pundits have more false statements (> 50%) than progressive/liberal commentators.

 

The second point to address is this very recent claim I have been seeing that Democrats have no agenda other than to oppose the current President and his efforts. This claim is puzzling, not because it is simply what has been put forth by pseudo-conservative talking heads over the past couple of months, but because it is simply false. Democrats are united in their opposition to simply rolling back all of the advancements that were made under the previous Administration. A review of President Trump’s Executive Orders demonstrate the majority of EO’s he has signed thus far are to repeal EO’s signed under the Obama, and to a lesser extent, the Bush (43) Administrations. Even the centerpiece of his legislative agenda thus far, the repeal (and replacement) of the Affordable Care Act, is not a new proposal but merely the rescinding of an Obama-era achievement.

 

It is hypocritical to suggest Democrats do not have anything of value to contribute to the legislative process when they are not even invited to participate in the drafting of legislation that would impact nearly 1/6th of the entire US economy. Republicans, when their healthcare proposals faltered caused folks like Majority Leader McConnell to state that the GOP might have to work with Democrats if they were unable to gather enough votes from their own side of the aisle. As if working across the aisle is a distasteful act that should be avoided at all costs. The fact the Republican proposals from the House and the Senate would be harmful to the most vulnerable of Americans, including large numbers of Trump voters, ensured Democrats would not support these measures. Republicans spent the last eight years obstructing the efforts of President Obama. Democrats have not even had to seriously obstruct the efforts of President Trump. His failure of leadership has meant that even the majority Republican Congress cannot get legislation to his desk.

 

The progressive agenda remains committed to improving the lives of working Americans and their families by reducing tax burdens on the middle and working class, providing educational opportunities for all, and ensuring affordable, accessible healthcare for every American. Democrats have supported an increase to the Federal Minimum Wage, equality for all Americans, the right of workers to organize and collectively bargain, the right of women to decide what medical care is appropriate for themselves, and improving the ease of voting in democratic elections. Considering that the Republican Party opposes these things, I can understand why there are some who think that opposition to the current President and the GOP legislative agenda is demonstrative of a lack of a political agenda. It is, I assure you, not the case. Refusing to stand by while pseudo-conservatives roll back advancements that have been made for the environment, for our kids, for the elderly, for the economy, for the working class, for the sick, and for our veterans is actually part of an agenda. An agenda that continues to maintain that the United States is a great nation that will continue to get better. If only the Republican Party would finally climb aboard that train. Until then, I will resist!!



Healthcare: Privilege or Right?

As Republicans struggle to obtain enough votes in the US Senate to pass their version of a bill (Better Care Reconciliation Act) that was originally brought forward to repeal, and replace, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) much focus has been placed upon the economic costs and the personal costs to those who would be affected should this legislation become enacted into law.  As one who has paid attention to the debate over healthcare access for the past three decades, I have been thinking of a much deeper question that we should be asking of ourselves as it would, perhaps, better drive the debate over this legislation.  The question that each of us should ask is this:  Should healthcare be considered a privilege, a commodity, that should be available only to those who can afford such care or, should it be considered a necessary right for every person that must be protected, and assured by government?

 

When I have posed this question to those who express opposition to the ACA, the most common response that I receive is that healthcare should be treated as any other service that a person would seek out.  The most common support offered for this position is that every person receiving services should be required to pay for such services.  To bolster this claim, these critics argue that it is not fair to expect others to pay for services that they receive.  On its face this appears to be a reasonable argument that must be considered.  After all, you wouldn’t take your car to a mechanic and not be expected to pay for repairs or maintenance on your vehicle.  You don’t take your family to a restaurant and expect to receive free food, do you?  You wouldn’t call an air conditioning repair person and expect to not receive a bill for the parts and services provided, would you?  These criticisms appear to suggest that healthcare services and products are no different than whether or not your vehicle or your heating and cooling systems at home are functional.  This is a false and illogical argument.

 

When one dines out at a restaurant, one knows what they can afford and if they are unable to afford to dine at a certain establishment they simply eat dinner at home or at a less expensive restaurant.  When your air conditioner is on the fritz, if you do not have the money available for repairs, you will need to open your windows, use fans, or other methods of staying cool.  For those with underlying health conditions in which extreme heat is dangerous, communities provide cooling centers, or family and friends are often able to step in to provide temporary shelter until the air conditioning is repaired.  Even if a new central air system must be installed, the cost is almost always going to be less than $5,000 USD.  Many heating and cooling companies will also finance this amount to keep costs manageable.  Similarly, if you need repairs on your automobile, you can determine what are the most crucial and pay for those and defer other repairs until later.  Or, your community may have decent public transportation available.  Or, you may be able to car-pool to work or use a ride-sharing service.

 

Healthcare, unlike these other services, is not a commodity that can simply be delayed in many cases.  I have frequently likened the provision of healthcare as an essential service that must be available to every single person.  Similar to a community that provides fire departments and trained personnel to operate this life-saving equipment.  Or, law enforcement agencies that respond to safety or criminal complaints.  Or, military agencies like the Coast Guard who respond to emergencies on our nation’s waterways.  We don’t bat an eye when we are asked to fund these critical services.  As a society, we have come to realize these are critical pieces of infrastructure that exist for the benefit of each of us even if we never need to directly use these services.  Why, then, do we look at healthcare differently?

When I have attempted to discern how so-called conservatives continue to maintain the position that healthcare is a commodity, and not a right, in addition to the arguments about paying for services and the burdens of having to pay for those who cannot afford these services, they remind me that healthcare services are already provided to people in the nation’s Emergency Departments (ED) regardless of one’s ability to pay for such care.  This, then, implies there is, in fact, some existential right to healthcare.  When I point out this inconsistency in logic, one person actually mentioned that fewer (uninsured) people seek medical care as if this implies lower costs to taxpayers.  The problem with this (il)logic is that while uninsured individuals are far less likely to present to a primary care physician in the community setting, they are far more likely to present to an ED for treatment of conditions that can be much more effectively, and economically, managed in a community setting by a primary care physician.  This translates into significantly increased healthcare costs for all of us.  The average cost of an ED visit in the United States is nearly $2,200 based on a study described in “The Atlantic.”  Compare this to the average cost to a primary care provider (PCP) in the US which is only $100 based on an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (ARHQ) study by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

 

A review of multiple studies has demonstrated that access to health insurance is correlated with significantly improved health outcomes.  The review, published recently in the “New England Journal of Medicine” (NEJM), documents that improved healthcare outcomes are especially notable among pediatric patients.  Further, this review notes that not only are healthcare outcomes improved, but other measures of quality of life, including educational achievement, are improved with access to health insurance.  Other studies have demonstrated the significant economic consequences associated with illness.  I am not only speaking of the direct costs associated with providing medically-necessary care, but the impacts that illness and preventable injury have on individual and societal economic stability and growth.

 

I believe we must frame the debate over access to health insurance as one of a necessary right that must be protected by government actions.  Only then, will we be able to determine the most effective means of financing healthcare in the United States.



Tomahawks and Trump

A few days ago, President Trump ordered the launch of 59 Tomahawk missiles to strike an air base in Syria.  Ostensibly, this was a response to the use of chemical weapons against the civilian populace.  Responses from critics and supporters have been mostly predictable.  Unfortunately, these responses miss crucial points.

 

The Constitutional conundrum:  Critics of the President’s actions point out that he lacks the Constitutional authority to initiate military actions without Congressional approval.  Article I, Section 8 clearly defines the role of Congress in declaring war.  Article II, Section 2, however, vests the authority of Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces with the President.  Congress passed the War Powers Act (WPA) to permit a President to initiate military action to immediately protect “vital national interests.”  Since its inception, every President has used this as a justification for carrying out military actions.  President Trump is no different than Presidents Carter, Reagan, H.W. Bush, Clinton, W. Bush, or Obama in claiming their actions are covered under this provision.  While it may be worthwhile to debate the legal merits of Trump’s justification, it is unlikely (particularly with a Republican Congress) that anything significant will come of this in the form of restricting legislation on a President’s authority under the WPA.  It is inconceivable the President acted against an imminent threat to crucial national interests that prevented him from seeking approval from Congress, as his predecessor did in 2013.  While Republicans in Congress rebuffed President Obama’s request for authorization of military force when President Assad used chemical weapons against his own citizens then, it is not clear how Congress would respond to a similar request made by the current President.

 

Moral maladaption:  Republican talking heads claim the President, even if lacking legal justification for launching an attack on Syrian territory, had a moral imperative to take action against the use of chemical weapons.  The President, himself, states that he was moved by the images of small children killed by the heinous use of such banned weapons.  I do not doubt that he, like the rest of us, was indeed moved by the horrific imagery of babies, children, women, and men suffering the effects of what appears to be the nerve agent, Sarin.  To suggest President Trump was not touched by these images is unfair to him.  We actually expect our President to act as a moral leader, promoting our values as a civilized nation.  A moral leader, however, would likely have sought the support of our allies in formulating a strong and clear message of condemnation on the use of chemical weapons rather than appearing to act impulsively, and alone, in carrying out an act of war that violates international norms.  There is an argument to be made that it is actually immoral for the President to order the launch of military actions that could lead to civilian casualties.  There is plenty of history of the United States, accidentally, or intentionally, launching military strikes that led to the deaths of many more women, babies, and children than the recent chemical attacks have caused.  A stronger counterargument to his supporters suggesting that Trump had a moral obligation to act would be to note that President Trump has repeatedly attempted to block all refugees from Syria entering the United States.  Perhaps, his rationale for striking the air base in Syria would ring less hollow had his ongoing efforts pertaining to the Syrian people not been construed as hostile to them and ambivalent toward the Syrian dictator.

 

Pocketbook penumbra:  To those who have suggested the President authorized use of Tomahawk missiles because he owns stock in Raytheon, the manufacturer, just stop!!  Of all the reasons one might consider for why the President selected this option, this is not going to be one of them.  While I have stated on multiple occasions that Donald Trump acts only in the interest of Donald Trump, even this claim is ridiculous to me.  Now, I will state that I am disappointed, make that disgusted, that with nearly $90 million in military weaponry launched into Syria the other day we did not even negatively impact the capabilities of the Syrian government to continue its air campaign against rebels for even a single day.  It is unclear whether we even sent an effective message deterring the regime from future use of chemical weapons in these strikes.

 

Donald’s doubletalk:  We know the current President changes his positions constantly.  We know that he lies and misleads.  In 2013, Donald Trump strongly opposed any military action in Syria.  He demanded then-President Obama seek approval from Congress prior to undertaking ANY military action in Syria even after it was confirmed the Assad regime had used chemical weapons against the Syrian people.  Why, then, would President Trump launch military strikes in Syria without prior notification of, and approval from, Congress.  President Obama actually DID seek approval from Congress to take action against Syria.  What, from a legal perspective, has changed in the interim?  Nothing.  To those who suggest these actions made him appear “Presidential,” need I remind you of comments made regarding the President’s State of the Union Address in February?  Within 36 hours, he had demonstrated that he had not made the “Presidential Pivot” that people on both sides of the political spectrum have implored him to make since gaining the nomination last July.

 

Donald’s distractions:  The Trump Administration has been an epic lesson in incompetence, confusion, unethical behavior, obfuscation, and, perhaps, worse.  From a series of gaffes involving our allies, his inability to articulate a clear strategy on any policy position, allegations of collusion with an adversarial government, basement-level poll numbers, and infighting within his inner circle of advisors, it has been suggested the President, perhaps, sought a distraction that might cast him in a more favorable light.  If this is the case, it is reprehensible and inexcusable.  A more benign reason for ordering military strikes in the manner he did is the lack of competent advice from advisors who lack the breadth and depth of knowledge and experience to more carefully coordinate these strikes to produce greater effect and reduce potential negative consequences.  This, too, is unacceptable.  This failure in competence has led to a lack of support from our allies and jeopardized the safety of US service members, particularly in the Syrian theater of operations where we are currently active.  Despite prior notification of the Russian government which minimized damage to Russian military assets at the airbase, the missile strikes have led to amped-up rhetoric from Russia including statements that Russia will no longer advise US military officials regarding military operations which may lead to inadvertent US military casualties at the hands of Russian military munitions.

 

The current President has positioned the United States on a very dangerous path with his reckless missile strikes on Syria.  The strikes appear to be merely symbolic and provided no tactical or strategic gains for the US.  They did not hamper Assad’s abilities to carry out attacks, including chemical weapons attacks, on his people.  They pushed Russia into a potentially stronger alliance with the Assad regime.  His disregard for the Constitution continues his trend of undermining our institutions of democracy.  Along with his increased use of military action, including drone strikes, that have led to the deaths of hundreds of civilians in the Middle East, he diminishes the safety of deployed US forces and the security of US citizens throughout the world.  A US Administration has traditionally been a stabilizing feature of the global community.  Under President Trump, this is no longer the case.  The President, and his Administration (with certain exceptions) have injected a level of uncertainty and instability that is not only foolish but is also extremely dangerous.



Healthcare: Commodity or Essential Right

The recently, spectacularly, failed American Healthcare Act (AHCA), once again, brought to the forefront the debate on whether healthcare access should be considered a commodity, much like an automobile, subject to the whims of a free market and made available to those who can afford it or, rather, that healthcare is an essential right of all Americans that must be guaranteed by government.  Democrats appear united behind the concept that healthcare access is crucial to society and must be available to every US citizen regardless of their economic status.  As the debate over the AHCA progressed, it became obvious that Republicans are divided over this central question.  Polling shows that overwhelming majorities of Americans believe every citizen should have access to high-quality, affordable, healthcare.  In this, it appears the GOP is at odds with the majority of Americans.

 

This week, President Trump signaled the AHCA is not actually dead and that his campaign pledge to repeal and replace the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known simply as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or, “Obamacare” continues onward.  The problem with this position is that the President has not articulated what this would look like.  Even with Republican majorities in both chambers of Congress, and without input from Democrats, a coherent plan that would meet the President’s promises of providing affordable health insurance to even more Americans, and at lower costs than the ACA, was not presented.  Competing factions within the Republican Congress ensured that no bill put forth would garner a majority of votes or even entice moderate Democrats to join in support.  Party leadership attempted to rush the bill through the House even prior to scoring by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) which ultimately decided that, although ten-year cost projections would reduce the budget, the result would be more people without health insurance than prior to enactment of the ACA.

 

After the AHCA was pulled prior to a vote, the President commented, “Who would have known that healthcare would be so complicated?”  What?!?!  Besides anyone who has ever studied this topic?  This point underlies a central problem within the Trump Administration.  There is a serious lack of competent Administration leadership that might be able to shepherd complicated proposals through a Congress that is itself lacking in effective leadership that is committed to promoting and implementing legislation that will serve to actually benefit the American people.  Basically, Republicans have demonstrated that, since at least 2010, they lack the ability, or desire, to govern in the best interests of the people.

 

The failure of the AHCA effectively leaves the Republican leadership in Congress with two choices.  They can continue in their efforts to undermine the ACA which will lead to its eventual collapse, or, they can work with Democrats to strengthen the law which is what a majority of Americans currently favor.  It should be noted that the ACA has been effective and would continue to remain viable for at least the next decade but for efforts of the Republican Party over the past seven years.  Elected Republicans, and right-wing talking heads on radio and television, have spent the last seven years misleading the American public.  This has resulted in ballot box gains, however, it has not actually helped the American people.  While the ACA did not seriously further the debate on whether healthcare was an essential right versus a commodity available to the highest bidder, it did suggest that access to insurance to provide for healthcare expenses was a necessary thing that should be promoted by government.  In contrast, the debate among Republicans since 2009 has brought into the open the role of government in healthcare access at all levels.  It should be noted that prior to 2010, there was no question that government should ensure the availability of some access to healthcare for all Americans.  In 1986, President Ronald Reagan signed the bipartisan Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) into law.  Likewise, COBRA was enacted under the Reagan Administration which provided individuals with a continuity of health insurance coverage.

 

The most recent debate between Republicans over the AHCA has placed a focus on whether government has any role in determining access to health insurance or healthcare itself.  This debate also served to highlight a disconnect between elected Republicans in Congress and their constituents.  Had the AHCA passed, the harms would have been felt significantly more among rural voters who overwhelmingly voted Republican over the past several election cycles.  The more extreme members of the GOP who make-up the Libertarian-wing (aka the Freedom Caucus formerly known as the Tea Party caucus) believe healthcare should be left to the winds of a completely free market.  Health insurers should be let alone to serve only the customers they desire and to charge whatever rates the free market might bear.  Let the buyer beware lest they procure a policy only to find out it lacks the protections necessary when they are needed, or worse, they are dis-enrolled when they become ill or seriously injured.  Somewhat more moderate Republicans seek to provide competition among insurers by removing obstacles to the sale of health insurance policies across state lines.  Theoretically, this appears to be reasonable, however, there are a significant number of realities that make this an unattractive proposal.  The biggest one is that insurance companies establish provider networks where they operate.  Healthcare providers are not likely to want to participate in a network that is out-of-state, perhaps in a different time zone, when they need to have their billing issues resolved or if they need to seek authorization for patient care.  This is inefficient and costly.  Another major issue affecting consumers is relating to the need to, perhaps, sue an insurance company for denial of a claim.  Consumers would be subjected to the laws of a particular state which might be much more favorable to the insurance company in a classic David and Goliath tale.

 

I doubt there is anyone who disagrees with the idea that society functions better when people are healthier.  Employee productivity is increased, chronic healthcare expenditures are decreased, and individual satisfaction is improved.  The United States outspends every other developed nation on healthcare but has significantly lower health outcomes on almost every measure.  Civilized societies throughout the world recognize this.  In promoting the well-being of their respective nations, leaders have already debated whether healthcare should be construed as a basic right to be assured by government.  It has been unanimously affirmed by economically- advanced societies that some level of healthcare must be provided for each person as by doing so it benefits every person.  The United States continues to be an outlier.  If, by independent measures, it was demonstrated that our status as an outlier made the health of our nation’s citizens better it would make perfect sense to continue our current system of healthcare delivery.  Unfortunately, this is not the case on ANY measure of national health.  Republicans continue to refuse to acknowledge this and continue to permit healthcare to consume ever-larger amounts of spending and an ever-growing share of our gross domestic product (GDP).

 

It is obvious the Republican Party is incapable, or unwilling to, of addressing this.  We, the people, must continue to demand healthcare access for all.  GOP-led efforts to undo the most significant healthcare reform in a generation is harmful to patients, providers, and insurers.  These efforts undermine the healthcare infrastructure and will lead to a significant collapse that would cause all of us to suffer.  If we recognize that a healthy citizenry makes for a more robust society, we must not maintain the idea of healthcare as a commodity to be enjoyed only by those who can afford it.  Essential healthcare must be available for all people.  This must be ensured by government.



Twinks and Trump

Today I read an Op-Ed in The Huffington Post regarding an actual group called, “Twinks 4 Trump.”  I learned there are actually two such things http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/im-a-gay-dad-and-heres-what-i-want-the-twinks-4-trump_us_57a469aae4b0ccb02372168d  One site is, apparently, a parody site with all photographs and the like.  The other is actually a group of younger gay guys who claim to be conservative who further claim to support Mr. Trump in his campaign to become the 45th President of the United States.  The founder of this second group is a young man named Lucian Wintrich.  He attempts to articulate reasons for being a, “conservative” and a supporter of Donald Trump here: http://www.advocate.com/commentary/2016/8/02/twinks4trump-creator-5-things-media-gets-wrong-about-gay-conservatives  The problem with his message, and I applaud, “The Advocate” for including this, is that Mr. Wintrich missed the memo that neither Mr. Trump, nor the Republican Party are conservative in any sense of the word.

 

Many Republicans are claiming that the GOP is the opposite of the Democratic Party.  They are correct as many who claim to be Democrats say the same thing.  The problem that supporters of the Grand Old Party miss is that the opposite of, “progressive” is not, “conservative.”  The antonym of progressive is actually regressive and this is what today’s Republican Party seeks to impose on our great nation.  This is a message they have honed and promoted over the past 50 years, long before Mr. Wintrich was even born.  Lucian Wintrich and another, “alt-right” golden boy, Milo Yiannopoulos, were not even born until after some of the biggest challenges facing the LGBT community had already been fought.  They reap the benefits of the hard-fought efforts of thousands of people who refused to back down in the face of bigotry, prejudice, discrimination, and violence.  I wonder if either of them have even read about Stonewall, Anita Bryant, the AIDS epidemic, Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Harvey Milk, Leonard Matlovich, ACT-UP, the Mattachine Society, and others who really paved the way for the lives they are free to lead today?  I will not sit idly by while the demagogues of the Republican Party seek to roll back all of the progress made to prevent discrimination and promote equality for all people.  I will not stand around while Republicans attempt to roll back the economic advancements that have occurred over the past eight years.

 

This phenomenon, that is the fallacy of a GOP that is a tolerant and inclusive political party, is not limited to this group of younger, mostly white, guys.  We have already learned the Republican Party Platform that was approved at this year’s Republican National Committee (RNC) convention is the most notoriously anti-LGBT platform in the party’s 162-year history!!  Another group that has been supportive of the GOP for years is the Log Cabin Republicans who have also failed to recognize the messaging they claim to support regarding smaller government and fiscal responsibility is not embodied in the principles or actions of the GOP today.  And yet, someone like Mr. Yiannopoulos proclaims Mr. Trump to be the, “most pro-gay candidate in history!”  While Mr. Trump is not the most anti-gay candidate in modern history, it is clear by his statements that he is not remotely, “pro-gay.”  At best, Donald Trump is apathetic to the concerns of the LGBT community.  He has promised to appoint judges who would reverse marriage equality and other non-discrimination measures that protect LGBT citizens.  I guess folks like Wintrich and Yiannopoulos think uttering the acronym, “LGBTQ” during an acceptance speech is proof the Republican Party has finally embraced them.  For the record, Mr. Trump’s use of this nomenclature was used in reference to an attack by a Muslim on a gay nightclub in Florida that left 49 people dead and many more wounded.  It should also be noted that Mr. Trump appeared surprised that no one on the convention floor booed at his use of this language.  This comment was not in support of LGBT people, it was designed to stoke hatred of Muslims!!  This is what was being applauded on the convention floor. http://reason.com/blog/2016/08/03/lgbtq-at-the-rnc-and-dnc

 

I can only hope that, “twinks” like Mr. Wintrich and Mr. Yiannopoulos come to their senses and realize there is no place at the table within today’s Republican Party for LGBT people.  The messaging of the party today is not one of inclusiveness.  It is about divisiveness, bigotry, misogyny, racism, xenophobia, and hatred.  There is hardly any reference to fiscal responsibility.  There has been no message of hope or tolerance.  I am happy that folks like Lucian and Milo can live their lives as they see fit and I truly hope they will never have to face the challenges faced by those who came before me and that my generation experienced.

 

I would challenge Mr. Wintrich and Mr. Yiannopoulos to articulate what they believe are the actual, “conservative” principles they believe they are supporting.  I look forward to seeing, or hearing, what they have to say on that.  I am pretty certain they will be limited to the bigoted, xenophobic, arguments espoused by the Republican candidate for President and these are not conservative principles at all.



Trumpets of Doom

This past week we were exposed to the spectacle that was the Republican National Convention.  I managed to catch bits and pieces of different speeches and read the running commentary on my Twitter feed and on Facebook.  I did take the time to watch the candidate, himself, give his acceptance speech on Thursday night.  What I observed this week is, to say the least, troubling for me as a progressive, voting, American.  The RNC convention was filled with darkness and despair.  It was, in a word, un-American, in my opinion.

 

From the refusal of the convention rules committee to respect the wishes of delegates in voting on the party platform on Monday, to the gaffes of color-coding elevator banks (White Elevators), posting white supremacist Tweets and anti-Semitic Tweets, and plagiarizing speeches, the promotion of an idea that the Democrat opponent would be arrested and jailed if Mr. Trump was elected President, and the very ugly idea that the Democratic nominee be marched in front of a firing squad by the Republican nominee’s veterans adviser, the campaign presented an ugly and hate-filled image to the world and, specifically, to Americans who are being asked to select the 45th President of the United States of America.  Even an innocuous photo showing Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan posing with the 2016 class of Republican interns demonstrated the big problem facing the Republican Party moving forward.  Surely, the Republican Party could have done better than this.

 

The events of this past week in Cleveland demonstrate a palpable anger of a large number of white Americans, a sense of frustration that transcends the typical values the Grand Old Party establishment has espoused for the past half century.  Make no mistake, the GOP has pushed the idea of racial politic for its benefit since the 1960’s.  The major difference during this campaign cycle is that the nominee has openly endorsed the idea that white people are losing ground to minorities in this country.  There is the explicit promise that Mr. Trump will, “take America back.”  Take it back from who?  Give the nation back to whom, exactly?  This nation belongs to each of us, Mr. Trump.  Each of us already has an ownership stake in the greatest nation on Earth!!  On the topic of greatness, Mr. Trump’s campaign slogan is, “Make America Great Again.”  Personally, I believe that any candidate who does not believe the United States of America is not currently the greatest nation on the planet is not fit to lead our country.  Hey, Donald Trump, if the United States of America is not currently the greatest nation in the world, tell us who we need to best to regain the title!!  Mr. Trump misses the point that greatness does not mean perfection.  The greatest leaders throughout history each had flaws.  This goes for individuals and nations.

 

President Franklin Roosevelt, in his first inauguration speech said, “So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory.”  http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5057  Mr. Trump, in his acceptance speech pushed a sense of fear throughout his speech.  I have to give him credit in that he recognizes that fear is, perhaps, the most powerful motivator of all living things.  Unfortunately, fear is not what makes a nation, or a leader, great.  In times of trouble or anxiety, people look to a leader for inspiration and hope.  For confidence and a sense of security.  People look for firm, rational, statements and assurances of how safety and security can be established.  Mr. Trump stoked the flames of fear in his campaign speech but failed to offer any rational assurances that he could provide this.  This consistent lack of substance does not appear to faze his supporters.  In fact, Mr. Trump has said that his supporters don’t care about policy.  His supporters may not care, however, those of us who consider ourselves thoughtful and rational, demand this information in order to make an informed decision at the voting booth!!  He commented that he will be the law and order President, but has demonstrated through his comments and prior speeches that he has no understanding of the law nor a desire to operate within the law.  Mr. Trump has been described as having an authoritarian management style.  Studies on authoritarians who have risen to power demonstrate that when people are so fearful, they have a tendency to turn to an authoritarian leader, regardless of qualifications, or lack thereof.  This is what Mr. Trump is counting on—that people are so irrationally fearful they will fall in line behind his campaign.  Thus far this has worked as he managed to beat out his, much better qualified, opponents in the primary campaign.  The problem with authoritarian politicians is that they tend to be brutal and violent towards their opponents, both domestically and globally.  Regarding the wealthy, and the bankers, FDR further stated, “They know only the rules of a generation of self-seekers. They have no vision, and when there is no vision the people perish.”  I have said on multiple occasions that Mr. Trump is primarily out to benefit himself.  He is a narcissist and demonstrates an unwillingness to compromise with others.  He has boasted of this in interviews, speeches, and in his books.  This is not the attitude of our nation’s diplomatic face to the world.  Even more dangerous, Donald Trump has praised the ideas of other authoritarian leaders including Vladimir Putin and Adolph Hitler.  Likewise, the current leaders of Russia and North Korea have praised Mr. Trump’s leadership style.  I am concerned when foes of this nation begin to praise a candidate for US President.

 

Mr. Trump has further raised the ire of leaders of nations that we consider allies.  This past week, he suggested that the United States may not honor agreements made with European nations should they be attacked by another state power.  Nothing instills confidence in our friends, or gives pause to our enemies, like a potential US President who says you’re on your own.  He has said that other nation’s should be free to pursue nuclear weapons and has refused to rule out the use of such weapons if faced with a tactical threat or even as a deterrent to non-state players on the battlefield.  Such commentary is not only irresponsible from a Presidential candidate, it is reckless and dangerous.

 

Perhaps, the most concerning thing about Donald Trump is that he is not a, one-off, an anomaly within the Republican Party.  Mr. Trump has become the face of the base of the contemporary Republican Party.  This twice-divorced, socially-moderate, candidate for US President has gained the support of Evangelical Christians.  He has been endorsed by anti-LGBT and anti-abortion, so-called, “family values” organizations even though he does not support these views.  This is why he has selected Governor Mike Pence of Indiana to be his Vice President.  Governor Pence is staunchly anti-LGBT and anti-women’s rights.  He has actually been endorsed by white-supremacists, the American Nazi Party, and other racist individuals and groups.  This should serve to inform the logical, reasoned person that Mr. Trump is a dangerous individual to be considered for the position of Commander-in-Chief of our nation’s Armed Forces and as the principal law enforcement officer of the United States.  The battle for control of the soul of the Republican Party has been won by a racist, bigoted, theocratic-minded bloc.  The fight for the hearts and minds of the people of the United States of America now begins.  While irrational fear is an incredibly powerful motivator, I maintain confidence that hope is an even more powerful motivator.



The Gettysburg Address – the Donald Trump Version
July 21, 2016, 12:59 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

The Gettysburg Address, as it might have been delivered by Donald Trump. You’re welcome. It was a long time ago – I don’t think anyone can even remember, but I can remember, I have a great me…

Source: The Gettysburg Address – the Donald Trump Version